The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Tobacco

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This article is part of the Tobacco portal on Sourcewatch funded from 2006 - 2009 by the American Legacy Foundation.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OHSA) held hearings in 1994 to ban smoking in workplaces. OSHA opened hearings in September 1994 on a proposal that amounted to a virtual ban on smoking in every workplace in the nation.

Description

The abbreviation for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is OSHA. A. Judson Wells, who conducted a 1994 study of passive smoke and heart disease, was a consultant to OSHA. [1] Joe Dear was the assistant secretary of labor in charge of OSHA in 1994. He was quoted regarding OSHA's proposed ban on workplace smoking. [2] OSHA opened hearings in September 1994 on a proposal that amounted to a virtual ban on smoking in every workplace in the nation, to address workplace safety. [3]

Sourcewatch resources

External resources

References

  1. Associated Press, August 1, 1994
  2. Washington Post, September 18, 1994
  3. Washington Post, September 18, 1994

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