Cambodian Center for Human Rights

From SourceWatch
Jump to: navigation, search

Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) "is a non-governmental, non-political and independent human rights organization founded by Mr. Kem Sokha, Member of Parliament (1993-1998) and Senator (1999-2002). It was registered with the Ministry of Interior in October 2002 and officially launched on November 12, 2002 to promote and protect democracy, human rights and development in the country." [1]

The US Department of State "supported the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) that promoted civil and political rights at public forums and created the Voice for Democracy radio program that became one of the most popular and broad-reaching sources of independent programming in Cambodia." [2]

"IRI has supported the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) since its inception in 2002. CCHR conducts public forums across the country and broadcasts daily radio programs to inform citizens of their political rights and to give them a platform to express their views freely. CCHR also investigates cases of political violence and puts pressure on the authorities to prosecute the offenders." [3]

"[F]ormer Cambodian Senator, Kem Sokha, opened the Cambodian Center for Human Rights on the strength of a $450,000 grant from the IRI. Sokha is a member of the Royalist party, which has been in coalition with Cambodia’s ruling Peoples Party since 1998." [4]

Contact

19, Street 287
Sangkat Boeung Kak 1
Khan Toul Kork
Phnom Penh, Kingdom of Cambodia
Phone: (+855) 23 883 832
Fax: (+855) 23 883 481
Web: http://www.cchr-cambodia.org/en

Resources and articles

Related Sourcewatch articles

References

  1. About, Cambodian Center for Human Rights, accessed January 21, 2008.
  2. Supporting Human Rights and Democracy: The U.S. Record 2003-2004, US Department of State, accessed January 21, 2008.
  3. Supporting Human Rights and Democracy: The U.S. Record 2003-2004, IRI, accessed January 21, 2008.
  4. Bill Myers, ”At It Again: Republicans meddle in Cambodian politics”, In These Times, April 14, 2003.