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BridgeTex Oil Pipeline

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This article is part of the Global Fossil Infrastructure Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor and the Center for Media and Democracy.
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BridgeTex Oil Pipeline is an oil pipeline in Texas, United States that transports crude oil from the Permian Basin to the Houston gulf coast.[1]


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Location

The pipeline originates in Colorado City, Texas, and terminates in Texas City, Texas.

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Project Details

  • Operator: Magellan Midstream Partners (50%), Plains All American Pipeline (50%) [1]
  • Current capacity: 400,000 barrels per day
  • Proposed additional capacity: 40,000 barrels per day[2]
  • Length: 400 miles (644 kilometers)[1]
  • Status: Operating
  • Start Year: September 2014[1]

Background

The BridgeTex pipeline transports Permian Basin crude oil from Colorado City, Texas to the Houston gulf coast area.[2]

In January 2017, an expansion of the BridgeTex pipeline from 300,000 barrels per day to 400,000 barrels per day was announced.[2] The expansion was completed in Q2 2017.[3]

In April 2017, Plains All American Pipeline and Magellan Midstream Partners filed an amended breach of contract lawsuit that seeks $311.8 million in damages from Stampede Energy, alleging the company failed to meet its minimum volume requirements on the BridgeTex pipeline beginning in March 2015.[3]

In July 2017, Magellan Midstream and Plains All American Pipeline announced that they were considering expanding the pipeline capacity further to 440,000 barrels per day.[3]

Spills

In September 2017, Magellan Midstream reported the largest Hurricane-Harvey-caused spill near Houston at a gasoline tank.[4] Initially estimating a spill of 1,000 barrels, Magellan Midstream later confirmed the spill was significantly larger, nearly 11,000 barrels.[4] Flooding from Hurricane Harvey inundated the Galena Park terminal east of Houston, causing the spill.[4] Federal and state regulators failed to publicly acknowledge the extent of the spill for nearly two weeks.[5]

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