BC Gas Pipeline

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This article is part of the Global Fossil Infrastructure Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor and the Center for Media and Democracy.
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BC Gas Pipeline is an operating natural gas pipeline in Canada.[1]

Location

The pipeline runs from Fort Nelson, British Columbia, to Sumas, Washington. There are two ongoing pipeline expansions adding 25 miles in Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada and Fort St. John, British Columbia, Canada.

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Project Details

  • Owner: Spectra Energy, a subsidiary of Westcoast Energy Inc.
  • Capacity: 3037.5 million cubic feet per day
  • Length: 1,773 miles / 2,854 km
  • Status: Operating
  • Start Year: 1957

Background

The BC Gas Pipeline extends from Fort Nelson to the US-Canadian border at Huntingdon-Sumas. The system transports approximately 60 percent of the natural gas produced in British Columbia, and supplies approximately half the natural gas demand in the American states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

Proposed Wynwood Expansion Location

The pipeline runs for 17 miles near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada.

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Proposed Wynwood Expansion Details

  • Operator: Spectra Energy, a subsidiary of Westcoast Energy Inc.
  • Proposed capacity: 50 million cubic feet per day
  • Proposed length: 17 miles / 27.4
  • Status: Shelved
  • Start Year:

Proposed Wynwood Pipeline Expansion Background

There is an additional proposed expansion project called the Wynwood Pipeline Expansion Project, which would add 50 million cubic feet per day and 17 miles of pipeline near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada. It is currently awaiting NEB approval.[2]

In August of 2017, Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) approved the Wyndwood Pipeline Expansion Project. The NEB attached 32 conditions to its approval, including the requirement to develop a Landowner-Specific Monitoring Plan and Consultation Update and a number of conditions related to minimizing disturbances within caribou ranges and accelerating the restoration of caribou habitat.[3]

There have been no development updates since 2017 and the project is presumed to be shelved.

Jackfish Lake Expansion Location

The pipeline will run from Taylor to Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada.

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Jackfish Lake Expansion Details

  • Operator: Spectra Energy, a subsidiary of Westcoast Energy Inc.
  • Proposed capacity: 137.5 million cubic feet per day
  • Proposed length: 22.4 miles / 36 kilometers
  • Status: Operating
  • Start Year:

Jackfish Lake Expansion Background

There is another proposed expansion project called Jackfish Lake Expansion. The first looping segment will start south of Taylor, on the south side of the Peace River, running about 12 kilometres. The second segment will start at the Pine River and run about 24 kilometres ending northeast of Chetwynd. Looping segments allow pipelines to have extra capacity, without increasing the pressure on the line. The project will also include a new compressor station, and modifications to an existing one in order to accommodate the increased volume of gas. When complete, the pipeline loop will add 137.5 million cubic feet per day of transportation capacity to Spectra Energy’s BC Pipeline, which transports processed, sales-quality natural gas - from facility primarily in Northeast B.C. - to markets throughout the province and the United States. Pending regulatory approval, construction is expected to begin in 2016, with an in-service date expected in late 2016 or early 2017. Spectra notes this timeline is subject to change.[4] The Jackfish Lake Expansion project was completed in 2017.[5]


Articles and resources

References

  1. Natural gas pipelines and processing, Enbridge website, accessed 13 December 2017
  2. Planned Projects, Pipeline News, accessed October 2018
  3. National Energy Board approves Wyndwood Pipeline Expansion Project, National Energy Board, August 10, 2017
  4. Spectra proposes loops for Fort St. John Mainline, Alaska Highway News, accessed October 2018
  5. Energy pipelines, IUOE, accessed February 2019

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External resources

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