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Food Rights Network

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WARNING! Sewage sludge is toxic. Food should not be grown in "biosolids." Join the Food Rights Network.

The Food Rights Network is a non-profit, non-partisan research and advocacy project of the Center for Media and Democracy. FRN opposes the biosolids scam of dumping toxic sewage sludge on farms and gardens. It is FRN's position that no food should no food should be grown in toxic sludge. FRN supports the milk drinker’s right to purchase and the farmer's right to sell raw milk both on and off the farm. FRN supports the policies and practices in dairy farming that make it possible to have appropriately sized herds and pasture for grazing that will help ensure good quality milk.

The Food Rights Network released its first major investigative report on July 9, 2010 titled: Chez Sludge: How the Sewage Sludge Industry Bedded Alice Waters. [1]

2010 Tests of San Francisco Sewage Sludge Find PBDEs, Triclosan

On August 10, 2010, the Food Rights Network announced in a news release that "Independent tests of sewage sludge-derived compost from the Synagro CVC plant -- distributed free to gardeners since 2007 by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission in their "organic biosolids compost" giveaway program -- have found appreciable concentrations of contaminants with endocrine-disruptive properties. The independent tests were conducted for the Food Rights Networkby Dr. Robert C. Hale of the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences."

In an August 6, 2010, letter reporting on his findings to the Food Rights Network Robert Hale wrote: "A sewage sludge-derived compost from the Synagro CVC plant, distributed by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission in their "compost give away" program, was analyzed for synthetic pollutants. Several classes of emerging contaminants with endocrine disruptive properties were detected in appreciable concentrations, including polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, nonylphenols (NPs) detergent breakdown products and the antibacterial agent triclosan." PDFs are attached here of the letter and the data: [2] [3] [4] [5]

Personnel

  • Lisa Graves, Executive Director, Center for Media and Democracy

Former Personnel

Contact Information

  • Food Rights Network
  • 409 East main Street, Suite 100, Madison, WI 53703
  • Phone: (608 260-9713
  • Website: http://www.FoodRightsNetwork.org/
  • Email: editor (AT) foodrightsnetwork (DOT) org

Related SourceWatch articles

References

  1. Chez Sludge: How the Sewage Sludge Industry Bedded Alice Waters, PRWatch.org, July 9, 2010
  2. Hale Letter 8/6/10
  3. Hale Data NP
  4. Hale Data PAH
  5. Hale Data PBDE

External resources

External articles